COVID Passports Not Needed, Says Russian Federation Council Speaker

"It is wrong to separate people, to give them different rights, based on the results of vaccination," says Russian Federation Council Speaker Valentina Matvienko. 

Nearly 60% of Russians are opposed to COVID passports, according to a recent survey.

According to Russian Federation Council Speaker Valentina Matvienko, there will be no need for COVID Passports in Russia.  While medical records are kept in electronic databases and vaccination records are accessible, they are not used for the purpose of discrimination or granting any special rights.

"No one said that Russia would introduce COVID passports," she pointed out. "It would be inappropriate to do it. It is wrong to separate people, to give them different rights, based on the results of vaccination."

Upper House Speaker Valentina Matviyenko, President Vladimir Putin, and State Duma Speaker Sergei Naryshkin

Nearly 60% of Russians are opposed to COVID passports, according to a recent survey conducted. Results showed that 59% of respondents do not support the possible introduction of COVID passports, 12% support the initiative, and 29% of respondents abstained. Earlier, a large international study found that a majority of Russians question the safety of vaccinations.

The Russian Minister of Health, Mikhail Murashko, has openly stated that Russia will not make immunization against COVID-19 compulsory.

"The presence or absence of vaccination against coronavirus should not limit citizens’ rights," says Alexey Agranovsky, Doctor of Biological Sciences, Professor of the Department of Virology, Faculty of Biology, Moscow State University. He suggests focusing on privileges for those who have been vaccinated.

"Everyone who urgently needs it, and especially those who have been ill, should be able to travel. Immunity, according to our data, is effective in all strains. However, there are restrictions from other countries. For those who have already been vaccinated, benefits or benefits, such as discounts on transportation, can be provided. You can think of a lot of privileges to interest the population. This is quite feasible,” he said.

Upper House Speaker Valentina Matviyenko, seated between Patriarch Kirill and President Vladimir Putin

In agreement with the above statements, the Russian Orthodox Church has repeatedly offered public statements, rejecting the idea of compulsory vaccination.

Commenting on the situation, the press secretary of the President of the Russian Federation Dmitry Peskov noted that there is still no official position on this issue. He says that talks are taking place within the framework of an expert discussion.

Sources: aebrus.ru / tellerreport.com / balthazarkorab.com

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