Russian Church Remains Vibrant in Ancient Crimea

Picturesque ruins of ancient basilica have been opened by archaeological excavations since late 19th century. They are not just ruins, however, but ancient Christian churches.

Originally appeared at: Global Orthodox

The ancient town of Chersonesus is more than two thousand five hundred years old. In the 6th century B.C., Greek settlers established a colony here, and it was the only ancient polis in the North Black Sea region where city life went on uninterrupted, all the way through the 14th century.

Today it is a suburb of the Russian port city of Sevastopol, on the southwest portion of the Crimean peninsula, part of the National Preserve of Tauric Chersonesus. Picturesque ruins of ancient basilica have been opened by archaeological excavations since late 19th century. They are not just ruins, however, but ancient Christian churches.

It is highly likely that Grand Prince St. Vladimir, who led the Eastern Slavs to embrace the Christian faith, was baptized here in A.D. 988.

On October 3, the clergy of the Sevastopol Church District with a large group of laity appeared here. Early in the morning, a procession started from nearby St. Vladimir Cathedral, followed by celebration of the Divine Liturgy. The tradition of holding Church services in ancient churches of Chersonesus is supported by the Foundation for Humanities My History, by the Sebastopol Church District, and by the National Preserve of Tauric Chersonesus.

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