EU Court: Employers Can Ban Religious Symbols from Employees

The European Court's decision applies not only to Islamic hijabs but also to Jewish or Christian symbols such as the kippah or cross.

Originally appeared at: UOJ

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) has confirmed the “right” of employers to prohibit employees from wearing visible religious signs in the workplace, reports kath.net.

The specific reason for this decision was a recent case in Belgium where a Muslim employee was banned from wearing a hijab at work.

Religious symbols are banned in Europe. Photo: new.point.md

She brought a claim to the Liege Labor Court, which appealed to the European Court. As a result, the court decided that the employer’s demand was legal and objectively justified.

Moreover, an employer can completely prohibit the wearing of visible religious signs during working hours and in the workplace.

The EU Court emphasized that this rule applies equally to all religions and applies not only to Islamic hijabs but also to Jewish or Christian symbols such as the kippah or cross.

The European Court of Justice is the highest authority of the Court of Justice of the European Union, whose decisions cannot be appealed.

As earlier reported, the Taliban intend to ban ties in Afghanistan, since they “symbolize the cross”.

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