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"The Scale of the Sin in Constantinople Simply Frightens Me," Says Head of Ukrainian Orthodox Church

"The Patriarchate of Constantinople has now fallen. And to be with him is to be in his crime against the Church"

I am a sinner. But the scale of the sin of the Constantinople Synod simply frightens me.

“Well, why argue, after all? Does it really matter which patriarchy or which church? There was Moscow, now there is Constantinople, then there will be Kiev . . ."

The question is not idle. Why even speak out against something, or protect something?

Metropolitan Onufriy — Head of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church

So many are surprised by the holy Forerunner, John the Baptist. I have sat on the banks of the Jordan river, thinking about him preaching and baptizing people there. Why did he denounce the king? Why was this his policy?

The fact is, where politics came into contact with moral issues, a person of such authority as John the Baptist did not have the right to remain silent.

After all, King Antipas was the leader of the religious people, he stood at the top of God's chosen people and served — whether voluntarily or involuntarily — as an example for those whom the saint called for repentance. Any act of the king could become either a temptation to sin, or an exalted example worthy of emulation. There needed to be a voice of conscience!

The moral crime of the king forced the Forerunner to raise his voice. And he ended up in jail.

The king then enjoyed having this righteous man nearby, and he engaged in long conversations with him.

It is possible that these conversations would have led to a change in the life of Herod Antipas, if not for the depraved dance of the young girl, his niece, during that binge of drunken bragging before his guests?

Was it worth it for John the Forerunner to denounce the king? Was it worth it to speak up when Herod was wrong, when he personally sinned?

How can we be silent now, when the patriarch of Constantinople sins against the Church of Christ?

Isn't it easier to close your eyes and say that you can also be saved under the Patriarch of Constantinople? You can say this is important because of love! Indeed, you can say almost anything. But the problem is that — in the words of the Apostle Paul — love is “not unreasonable.” And if this slumber is imposed under the guise of love, this is a pure crime! It is a crime against Love itself!

For centuries, the church has been developing various canons and laws, holding the Church's life in proper order. A single violation is painful when committed by any Christian. But a special, fatal wound occurs when a Church leader does it, and when those who are called to watch over the Church — Bishops — contribute to this robbery!

Power, wealth and politics destroy Christianity in everyone who clings to this dirt. The Patriarchate of Constantinople has now fallen. And to be with him is to be in his crime against the Church, and against Love. I cannot agree to this.

I am a sinner. But the scale of the sin of the Constantinople Synod simply frightens me.

Thus, I remain with the persecuted Church. But I am standing in the right position, in the position of the True Church. And because of this, I am happy.

I am happy, because only those who are faithful to Christ are willing to remain in this Church. I look with reverence at the holy bishops, priests, and laity of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, who build up the fullness of holiness with their loyalty. And I ask them not to reject me, a sinner.


Source: Union of Orthodox Journalists